Welcome from BIO Assistant Director Dr. James Olds

As the Assistant Director of the Directorate for Biological SciePhoto Dr. James Oldsnces (BIO) at the National Science Foundation, it is my pleasure to welcome you to BIO Buzz, the blog for BIO’s Office of the Assistant Director. This blog will be a platform for disseminating information about policies, procedures, activities and initiatives that extend across BIO Divisions and affect the biological sciences community as a whole.

My vision for the Directorate requires that the shared core values of the BIO Divisions—transparency, accountability, and inclusiveness—are reflected in the activities of the BIO Front Office. One step toward realizing this vision is to advance our existing communications strategy and enhance engagement within the Directorate and between BIO, the scientific community, and the general public. Effective communication is essential to fulfilling the missions of NSF and BIO. We hope you find the information here informative. Welcome to BIO Buzz!

The BRAIN Initiative: Three Years at the Frontiers of Neuroscience | The Kavli Foundation

In this Science Spotlight from the Kavli Foundation, a group comprising scientists and funders, including the NSF’s Assistant Director for Biological Sciences, Dr. Jim Olds, reflects on what the BRAIN Initiative has already achieved and how it is evolving.

Article: The BRAIN Initiative: Three Years at the Frontiers of Neuroscience | The Kavli Foundation

Coordinating Global Brain Projects Event

September 14, 2016

Coordinating Global Brain Projects

Due to revolutionary new technologies, neuroscientists are poised to significantly advance our understanding of the brain and behavior, with profound implications for health and society.

To enhance collaboration and better coordinate global efforts in fundamental neuroscience research, the National Science Foundation (NSF) will support a conference of scientists and government representatives from countries with significant investments in neuroscience research. Attendees, many of whom are members of the U.S. BRAIN Initiative, a public-private collaborative effort aimed at accelerating the development and application of new technologies to revolutionize our understanding of the brain, will exchange ideas and information about their efforts and identify new opportunities for collaboration.

rat hippocampus,
This image shows a rat hippocampus, a region of the brain critical for learning, memory and emotion. Credit: Elyse L. Aurbach, Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute, University of Michigan

NSF and The Kavli Foundation will support the event, hosted by Rockefeller University in cooperation with Columbia University.

“Brain diseases and disorders affect millions of families worldwide, leading to billions of dollars in medical expenses and lost productivity,” said NSF Director France Córdova, who will deliver opening remarks at the event. “This event is intended to promote collaboration and cooperation in emerging, large-scale international brain projects to further advance neuroscience research. NSF plays a pivotal role in funding brain research, bringing the research community together and shaping the vision for a global brain initiative.”

The NSF’s Assistant Director for Biological Sciences, Dr. Jim Olds, will present information about the NSF’s participation in the U.S. BRAIN Initiative.

The U.S. State Department, the Global Partnerships Forum, The Kavli Foundation and NSF will also host a complementary event at the U.N. headquarters in New York City the evening of Sept. 19.

Use the hashtag #globalbrain to follow the conversation on social media.

For event details, please see the official NSF Media Advisory: http://go.usa.gov/xKrFd

Related links:


BIO OAD Hosts HACU Summer Intern

August 15, 2016
Guest blogger: Nicolle Omiotek

This summer I was a HACU intern in BIO’s Office of the Assistant Director (OAD). I am from Illinois where I attend Elgin Community College. I have completed a variety of science and mathematics courses and was excited to spend the summer at the National Science Foundation.

You might be wondering, “What is HACU?” HACU is the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. The HACU internship program provides students who attend Hispanic-serving institutions with an opportunity to experience working at a variety of places including federal agencies. Luckily, I was selected by the NSF to be an intern for summer 2016. This internship has been a life-altering experience that has shown me that there are many potential career paths for scientists.

What did I work on during my internship?

My major project was to collect, analyze, and categorize data related to model species used in research supported by BIO’s Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS). Model species data in IOS’ funding portfolio have never been systematically categorized before.

I created a standardized method for gathering and analyzing information from proposals. I identified key terms related to my project such as species, kingdoms, and common names, and determined if the project involved single organisms or multiple organisms, and if the latter, whether the organisms were in a symbiotic relationship. The majority of the portfolio consisted of single-organism awards but some involved research on multiple species.

Photo of Nicolle in front of a sign for the Biological Science Directorate with a tv monitor behind her displaying a photo of a sloth.
BIO OAD’s HACU intern Nicolle Omiotek created multimedia displays for the BIO Directorate highlighting NSF-funded research.

Following the collection and cleaning of data, I envisioned a way to accurately represent the data visually. I presented my findings to NSF staff and other HACU interns. This was my favorite part because I shared the data I collected over the summer and the findings that I found most interesting.

To collect the data for my project, I read many NSF proposals, which meant I had the wonderful opportunity to learn about the exciting research that has been supported by IOS and the organisms involved. For example, I was fascinated to discover that the male sage-grouse has inflatable air sacs on its chest that are used in mating behaviors.

Another fun project I was able to work on included making slide presentations of recent NSF-funded discoveries for display in the hallways of the BIO Directorate. I also learned about communicating science via social media. In addition, I attended many lectures on diverse science topics at NSF.

A life changing experience

During my time in BIO/OAD I had the great pleasure to work with Dr. Caitlin Schrein, Science Writer, and Dr. Brent Miller, Science Advisor. They were helpful every step of the way. Overall my experience has been enlightening, exciting, educational, and inspirational for continuing my path into science. I am looking forward to applying everything I learned both academically and professionally.

Big thanks to Dr. Miller, Dr. Schrein, the entire BIO/OAD office and NSF, HACU, Dr. Sherrie Green (NSF), and Kathy Meisinger (Elgin Community College).

Learn more about the HACU National Internship Program (HNIP):  http://www.hacu.net/hacu/HNIP.asp

Follow HNIP on Twitter: www.twitter.com/HNIP 

Assistant Director for BIO Attends Cancer Moonshot Summit

On June 29, 2016, the Cancer Moonshot Summit was held on the campus of Howard University in Washington, DC. The National Science Foundation’s Assistant Director for the Directorate for Biological Sciences, Dr. Jim Olds, was pleased to represent the Foundation at the event.

From the Office of the Vice President of the United States:

“In his final State of the Union address, the President tasked the Vice President with heading up a new national effort, the Cancer Moonshot. The ultimate goal is to double the rate of progress—to make a decade’s worth of advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care in five years—to ultimately end cancer as we know it.

The goals of this effort cannot be achieved by one person, one organization, or one discipline. Solving the complexities of cancer will require the formation of new alliances to defy the bounds of innovation and accelerate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and—ultimately—a cure. It’s going to require millions of Americans speaking up and contributing what they’re able.

The Cancer Moonshot Summit will be a venue to bring together all sectors that have a role to play in making progress on the Cancer Moonshot goals to share new ideas and launch new collaborations and actions.

The Cancer Moonshot is a mission, and all of us #CanServe. How will you make a difference, break down barriers to progress, or catalyze change where you live or work?

Photo of Dr. Olds at Summit with quote: I can serve by ensuring support for the highest quality fundamental biological sciences research

#PollinatorWeek has US Buzzing

June 22, 2016

This afternoon the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) released the Pollinator Partnership Action Plan (PPAP). The PPAP accompanies the National Strategy to Promote Pollinator Health, released by OSTP in 2015 along with the science-based Pollinator Research Action Plan.

The National Strategy to Promote Pollinator Health has three goals:

  1. Reduce honey bee colony losses to economically sustainable levels;
  2. Increase monarch butterfly numbers to protect the annual migration; and
  3. Restore or enhance millions of acres of land for pollinators through combined public and private action.

To compliment today’s PPAP release, the National Science Foundation (NSF) summarized the agency’s pollinator portfolio (i.e., what the NSF funds in this area). The NSF supports many basic research and education programs and projects relevant to the National Strategy to Promote Pollinator Health. The majority of awards related to pollinators are made through the Directorate for Biological Sciences, but pollinator research is supported throughout the NSF. The NSF Pollinator Portfolio summary can be found here: http://go.usa.gov/xq5QB.

A bumblebee foraging on the petals of a larkspur flower.
A larkspur flower with a guest—a bumblebee foraging on its petals. (Credit: Karen Levy, Emory University)

To celebrate #PollinatorWeek, the NSF has also published an article on Medium highlighting NSF-funded research news and discoveries related to pollinator health.

Learn more about the National Strategy to Promote Pollinator Health, the PPAP, and how you can nurture and celebrate pollinators on the OSTP blog.

NSF Announces Participation in National Microbiome Initiative

(Updated May 16, 2016)

On May 13, 2016, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, in collaboration with Federal agencies and private-sector stakeholders, announced the National Microbiome Initiative (NMI).

As shared by OSTP, “Microbiomes are the communities of microorganisms that live on or in people, plants, soil, oceans, and the atmosphere. Microbiomes maintain healthy function of these diverse ecosystems, influencing human health, climate change, food security, and other factors. The NMI aims to advance understanding of microbiomes to aid in the development of useful applications in areas such as health care, food production, and environmental restoration.”

To kick off the NMI, OSTP hosted an event at the White House to hear from community and research leaders about microbiome science, and opportunities for collaboration and progress. The National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Assistant Director for the Directorate for Biological Sciences (BIO), Dr. Jim Olds, participated in the event as a member of a federal agency panel.

Dr. Olds was proud to announce NSF’s participation in this initiative through a Dear Colleague Letter (NSF 16-087) highlighting NSF BIO’s vision and approach to support and encourage microbiome research across the phylogenetic spectrum and biological scales; from host – microbe interactions to ecosystems. NSF BIO will also foster the development of a national research infrastructure to support collaborative science on microbiomes.

Dear Colleague Letter title: Supporting Research Advances in Microbiomes

NSF BIO encourages proposals that advance discovery in the realm of microbiomes with support through several programs in fiscal year 2017. These programs cross the entire BIO Directorate and span basic science through translational research that addresses pressing global challenges and support the development of tools needed for the 21st century.

To learn more about NSF BIO’s participation in the National Microbiome Intiative, access the Dear Colleague Letter here:  http://go.usa.gov/cuSMH

Scuba diving researchers collect samples from coral.
Researchers Rebecca Vega Thurber and Ryan McMinds on a mission to obtain samples from a reef. Research on coral microbiomes is funded by the NSF through a Dimensions of Biodiversity award. Read more: http://go.usa.gov/cuS6m
Photo Credit: Ryan McMinds

BIO’s Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS) Home Page
IOS Core Funding Programs Page (including EDGE Track)
Plant-Biotic Interactions Program Page (IOS and USDA/NIFA)
Symbiosis, Defense, and Self-Recognition Program (IOS Physiological and Structural Systems Cluster Page)
BIO’s Division of Environmental (DEB) Biology Home Page
DEB Core Funding Programs Page
BIO’s Division of Biological Infrastructure (DBI) Advances in Biological Informatics Program Page
Systems and Synthetic Biology Cluster of BIO’s Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Page

NSF Hosts Delegation from China

On Thursday, April 21, 2016, a delegation from the Chinese Ministry of Science & Technology (MOST) and the Embassy of China visited the National Science Foundation. The delegates met with representatives from across the Foundation, including Assistant Director for BIO, Dr. Jim Olds.

The delegation discussed current NSF partnerships through the East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes (EAPSI) and Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) programs and talked about potential areas for future collaboration. The meetings were highly informative and strengthened the good relationship between NSF and MOST.

Photo of delegation with staff and management of the NSF.
Top row, left to right: Paula Mabee (Division Director, BIO/DEB), Jim Deshler (Deputy Division Director, BIO/DBI), LV Jia (Deputy Director, Division of Americas and Oceania, Department of International Cooperation, MOST), Matthew Hawkins (Division Director, NSF/BFA Large Facilities Office), WANG Lian (Third Secretary, Embassy of P.R. China), QIAO Jian (Third Secretary, Embassy of P.R. China)
Bottom row, left to right: Karen Alroy (Science Associate, BIO/DEB), Rebecca Keiser (Office Head, NSF/OISE), Jim Olds (Assistant Director, BIO), CAI Jianing (Associate Counsel, Department of International Cooperation, MOST)

NSF Division of Environmental Biology Visits China
NSF Beijing Office

Strengthening Research Capacity at HBCUs

In FY 2015, the Advisory Committee for the NSF’s Directorate for Education and Human Resources convened a subcommittee of leaders from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to devise a comprehensive strategy to accelerate significant competitive opportunities for HBCUs through NSF’s Research and Related Activities (R&RA) programs.

Image of blackboard with title of Dear Colleague Letter

To help implement this strategy, NSF has just published a Dear Colleague Letter (NSF 16-080) titled “Strengthening Research Capacity at Historically Black Colleges and Universities.” These actions are in keeping with guidance provided in NSF’s appropriations for FY 2015 and FY 2016 related to increasing the research capacity at HBCUs.

NSF invites proposers from HBCUs to submit supplemental funding requests to EHR’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities – Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) and other awards that would increase research capacity of faculty and postdoctoral fellows in NSF-supported areas of research.

Additionally, NSF also invites HBCUs to submit EArly-concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) proposals to the HBCU-UP program to explore new directions or appropriate extensions of disciplinary-based research activities.

For complete information about this funding opportunity, please read the DCL (NSF 16-080): http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2016/nsf16080/nsf16080.jsp

Exploring Microbiome Opportunities Symposium

On April 20, 2016, the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison hosted a one-day symposium on “Exploring Microbiome Opportunities in Life Sciences and Agriculture.” Jo Handelsman, Associate Director for Science at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) gave an overview of the significance of microbiome research for several priorities of the Obama administration, including the precision medicine initiative, climate change, soil erosion, forensic biology, national security, alternative energy, and economic opportunities. James I. Prosser from the Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences at the University of Aberdeen then delivered a plenary lecture about the long-term goals and challenges for microbiome research.

Photo of four panelists
Left to Right: Jo Handelsman, Assistant Director for Science at OSTP, H. Gert de Couet, NSF BIO Division Director in IOS, Joseph Graber, Program Director at DOE, and Lita Proctor, Program Director and Project Coordinator at HMP (Credit: Sevie Kenyon, UW-Madison)
The plenary lectures were followed by presentations of the diverse portfolio of microbiome research projects conducted at UW-Madison. The symposium concluded with a panel discussion of funding opportunities for microbiome research. Participants were Jo Handelsman, Assistant Director for Science at OSTP, Lita Proctor, Program Director and Project Coordinator of the Human Microbiome project at NIH (HMP), and Joseph Graber, Program Director at the Department of Energy (DOE). NSF was represented by H. Gert de Couet, Division Director in BIO’s Division of Integrative Organismal Systems (IOS).

NEON Management Update

March 16, 2016
(Updated links March 23)

The National Science Foundation has completed the process for selecting the new managing organization of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and have chosen Battelle Memorial Institute.

For more information about the selection and future updates about NEON, please visit the NEON Program Summary page and the NSF NEON Special Report on nsf.gov.

NEON site design
Image credit: neonscience.org